News and Events

News

CSLC Moving to Bond Hall

Author: Guieswende Rouamba

We are excited to announce that in July 2019, the CSLC will move to the 3rd floor of Bond Hall, where we will enjoy expanded space for our core programs and student services as well as proximity to flexible-learning classrooms designed specifically for language learning. Bond Hall has been reimagined as an integrated hub for student success organizations; it will also be outfitted with a number of new and innovative learning spaces. We are delighted to be a part of this vision and believe our new home will enable us to expand the impact of our many successful programs, including peer tutoring, language tables, study and conversation groups, and cultural events.  "It was clear that the CSLC had outgrown 329 DeBartolo Hall, in view of the intense demand for our offerings and the continuing urgency to anchor language and culture at the center of a Notre Dame education, " said Dr. Brian Ó Conchubhair, CSLC Director. "We are thrilled to have gained more space for our programs and services, look forward to designing and using new classrooms calibrated for language pedagogy, and are delighted to be working in close proximity with other student learning organizations."  

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Nonverbal Communication

Author: Brandon Cook

Not all communication is verbal; gestures, facial expressions, and body position – although silent – can say a lot about an individual’s (and your own!) thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and intentions. In this workshop, we discussed some principles of nonverbal communication and culturally specific expressions of body language techniques relevant to effective interpersonal communication and networking in the United States. …

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Events

Wed Sep 25, 2019

Mine, Yours, and Theirs: Giving Credit and Taking Responsibility in Academic Writing

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Location: 116 O'Shaughnessey Hall

American academic culture simultaneously places high value on originality and on thorough review of the work of previous scholars. Learning how to balance these two demands is difficult, as expectations arise from complex cultural norms that cannot be internalized merely by following a prescribed citation style. In this workshop, we will examine both the broad assumptions that govern the perception of plagiarism in American academic culture and learn strategies for giving credit to other writers while developing a unique authorial voice.…

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Wed Oct 9, 2019

Extensive Reading: How to Implement it.

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Location: 246 Hesburgh Library

Extensive reading (ER) is the independent reading of many, various, self-selected, easy materials (Day & Bamford, 2004). It is different from the traditional, teacher-centered intensive reading. Learn how ER can be a robust and flexible method for encouraging autonomous learning, serve increasingly diverse groups of students, satisfy their individual needs and provide an opportunity for teachers to reflect on their own teaching.

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Wed Oct 16, 2019

Stove, Move, Love: Improving Your English Pronunciation

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Location: 116 O'Shaughnessey Hall

There is often a great distance between the way English words are written and the way they are pronounced. This problem is further complicated by the many different regional and national accents that learners encounter at our university. We will examine how intonation and context influence pronunciation at the level of the word, sentence, and paragraph. Attendees will learn how to boost their comprehension of others while making themselves more easily understood.…

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Thu Oct 17, 2019